Posts for: October, 2015

By Jeffrey Mason, D.M.D.
October 29, 2015
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: Veneers  

Chances are that one or several of your favorite celebrities have enhanced their smile with the help of dental veneers. Zac Efron, Tom Cruise, Demi Moore, Katie Holmes, Victoria Beckham, 50 Cent, and Nicholas Cage to name a few have all stepped out with visible improvements to the symmetry and brightness of their smiles at some point in their careers.Veneers

What are Veneers?

Dental veneers can help to improve the quality and cosmetic appearance of a smile on several levels. Dr. Jeffrey Mason, a dentist in Hasbrouck Heights, NJ, offers porcelain veneers to fix chipped, cracked, stained, and damaged teeth. Made of thin layers of porcelain or plastic, veneers are designed to match the shade and appearance of natural teeth to produce an even, brighter smile.

While veneers can help to correct stained and discolored teeth, maintaining proper oral healthcare routines and habits is important to keeping the veneers and natural teeth clean, and to prevent problems like tooth decay and gum disease.

Practice Preventive Oral Hygiene Care

The steps that work to keep your natural teeth healthy and stain-free also apply to maintaining your new veneers. Factors like what you eat and drink, certain medications, and how well you take care of your gums and teeth between dental visits will still apply after getting a new set of veneers. Following a few sensible oral health and hygiene practices will ensure that your new veneers - as well as your natural teeth - remain bright and disease free.

Brush and floss regularly - Keeping the teeth and veneers free of sugar, plaque, and gum disease causing tartar is the most important step in maintaining a healthy smile.

Watch what you eat - Certain foods and drinks like tea, coffee, red wine, and berries can stain the surface of teeth and veneers.

To learn more about how veneers can help to improve your smile, contact Dr. Jeffrey Mason in Hasbrouck Heights at 201-288-4447 to schedule a consultation today!


By Jeffrey Mason, DMD
October 21, 2015
Category: Oral Health
BeyonceMakesFlossingaFamilyAffair

As is the case with most celebs today, Beyonce is no stranger to sharing on social media… but she really got our attention with a video she recently posted on instagram. The clip shows the superstar songstress — along with her adorable three-year old daughter Blue Ivy — flossing their teeth! In the background, a vocalist (sounding remarkably like her husband Jay-Z) repeats the phrase “flossin’…flossin’…” as mom and daughter appear to take care of their dental hygiene in time with the beat: https://instagram.com/p/073CF1vw07/?taken-by=beyonce

We’re happy that this clip highlights the importance of helping kids get an early start on good oral hygiene. And, according to authorities like the American Dental Association and the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry, age 3 is about the right time for kids to begin getting involved in the care of their own teeth.

Of course, parents should start paying attention to their kids’ oral hygiene long before age three. In fact, as soon as baby’s tiny teeth make their first appearance, the teeth and gums can be cleaned with a soft brush or cloth and a smear of fluoride toothpaste, about the size of a grain of rice. Around age 3, kids will develop the ability to spit out toothpaste. That’s when you can increase the amount of toothpaste a little, and start explaining to them how you clean all around the teeth on the top and bottom of the mouth. Depending on your child’s dexterity, age 3 might be a good time to let them have a try at brushing by themselves.

Ready to help your kids take the first steps to a lifetime of good dental checkups? Place a pea-sized dab of fluoride toothpaste on a soft-bristled brush, and gently guide them as they clean in front, in back, on all surfaces of each tooth. At first, it’s a good idea to take turns brushing. That way, you can be sure they’re learning the right techniques and keeping their teeth plaque-free, while making the experience challenging and fun.

Most kids will need parental supervision and help with brushing until around age 6. As they develop better hand-eye coordination and the ability to follow through with the cleaning regimen, they can be left on their own more. But even the best may need some “brushing up” on their tooth-cleaning techniques from time to time.

What about flossing? While it’s an essential part of good oral hygiene, it does take a little more dexterity to do it properly. Flossing the gaps between teeth should be started when the teeth begin growing close to one another. Depending on how a child’s teeth are spaced, perhaps only the back ones will need to be flossed at first. Even after they learn to brush, kids may still need help flossing — but a floss holder (like the one Beyonce is using in the clip) can make the job a lot easier.

If you would like more information about maintaining your children’s oral hygiene, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Top 10 Oral Health Tips For Children” and “How to Help Your Child Develop the Best Habits for Oral Health.”


By Jeffrey Mason, DMD
October 06, 2015
Category: Oral Health
Tags: x-rays  
BitewingX-raysYourQuestionsAnswered

Radiographic (x-ray) images are an indispensible diagnostic tool in dentistry. One of the most routine and useful types of x-rays dentists take is the so-called bitewing. Here are some things you may want to know about this common diagnostic procedure.

What are bitewing x-rays?
Bitewings reveal the presence and extent of decay in the back teeth, specifically in areas where adjacent teeth touch each other. Unlike other areas of the teeth, these contacting surfaces between adjacent teeth can’t be examined visually. Bitewings can also show areas of bone loss around teeth — a sign of periodontal disease; however, they are not taken for that purpose because bitewings will not show the complete root surface that is surrounded by bone.

Why are they called that?
The name “bitewing” refers to how the film — or sensor, in the case of a digital x-ray — is positioned in the mouth: The patient bites down on a little tab or wing that holds the apparatus in place.

How often do I need them?
This is determined on a case-by-case basis, with the goal of not exposing you to any more radiation than necessary — even the minimal amount found in a series of bitewing x-rays. Your individual susceptibility to caries (tooth decay) and personal dental history will play a major role in determining how frequently you need radiographic examination — and, for that matter, how often you need to come in for routine cleanings and exams.

Are they safe?
The safety of bitewing x-rays is best illustrated with a comparison to the regular daily radiation exposure we get every day from environmental sources, which is about 0.01 millisieverts — the unit of measure we use for radiation. A series of 4 bitewing x-rays exposes you to 0.004 millisieverts of radiation — less than half of the daily exposure. Undetected tooth decay, which can spread quickly through the softer inner layers of teeth, is considered much more dangerous!

If a bitewing x-ray shows that there is tooth decay, what happens next?
If the cavity is very small, we may be able to treat it during the same appointment. If not, we will make a separate appointment to make sure it is taken care of promptly. The sooner tooth decay is treated, the better!

What if I have more questions?
Contact our office, or schedule an appointment for a consultation.