Posts for: January, 2022

By Jeffrey Mason, DMD
January 13, 2022
Category: Cosmetic Dentistry
Tags: Veneers  

Dr. Jeffrey Mason recognizes the benefit of veneers on a person's smile. However, patients in Hasbrouck, NJ, and the surrounding area might be concerned about the safety of this procedure. So, Dr. Mason would like to take a moment to explain whether he recommends this procedure or not and for which patients. 

What Dentists Recommend Veneers For 

When you visit a dentist in Hasbrouck, NJ, to correct aesthetic problems with your teeth, veneers could be a solution. In fact, veneers help with the following issues:

  • Discolored teeth
  • Misalignments 
  • Minor gaps  
  • Cracks and chips

Why Veneers Could Be Risky 

The reason why people question if a dentist recommends veneers is because, with certain varieties, the dentist shaves a portion of your natural tooth. However, despite removing some of your natural teeth, which won't regenerate, veneers are safe for most people. The amount of tooth removed is minimal, even with versions that require a practitioner to remove some of your teeth. Your dentist will strive to remove as little of your tooth as possible. 

Moreover, your dentist will examine your teeth to ensure the procedure is safe for you. For instance, if you have thin enamel, your dentist will recommend a variety that doesn't remove any of your natural teeth. On the other hand, a practitioner will possibly advise you to receive another correction method. Your dentist will evaluate the health of your gums and teeth first because if you have gum disease, untreated decay, or other oral health problems, you may not qualify for this procedure. Additionally, it's best not to get this procedure if you grind your teeth.  

When a Dentist Recommends Veneers

A dentist will recommend veneers if you're looking for tooth correction for various aesthetic issues. A practitioner will consider this procedure if you're interested in it and have no oral health issues that could interfere with its safety. Therefore, a dentist may recommend this treatment if you're looking for a more permanent correction method. 

Dr. Mason helps Hasbrouck, NJ, smile brightly with routine dentistry services. However, Dr. Mason also provides and recommends the option of veneers for people who are looking to correct imperfections with their smiles. 

Contact Dr. Mason at 201-288-4447 to discuss if veneers are a feasible and safe solution for you. 


By Jeffrey Mason, DMD
January 11, 2022
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral hygiene  
4TipsForImprovingYourOralHygieneTechnique

Although we've advanced leaps and bounds over the years treating dental disease, our strategy for preventing them hasn't changed much. That's because these prevention basics are quite effective—and as the old saying goes, "If it ain't broke, don't fix it."

The core of an effective dental disease prevention strategy is mind-numbingly simple—brush and floss every day. These twin cleaning tasks remove accumulated dental plaque, a thin, bacterial film on tooth surfaces that's the primary oral disease driver.

True, there have been innovations concerning the "tools of the trade," i.e., toothbrushes, toothpastes and flossing devices. But what really makes this prevention strategy work is a consistent daily habit of oral hygiene.

In a way, simply "showing up" for daily oral hygiene goes a long way. But you can go even farther if you perform these tasks with greater proficiency—becoming a hygiene "ninja," of sorts.

Here, then, are 4 tips to improve your brushing and flossing prowess.

Be thorough when you brush. Try to cover all of your tooth surfaces when you brush, being sure to work the bristles into all the nooks and crannies and around the gum lines. A thorough brushing should take about 2 minutes.

Easy does it. Hard scrubbing may work on floors, but not your teeth—aggressive brushing can damage your enamel and gums. Brush gently and let the mild abrasives in your toothpaste do the heavy work of plaque removal.

Don't forget to floss. Although you may not like this "other hygiene task," flossing is necessary to remove plaque between teeth that your brush can't reach. Be sure, then, that you floss at least once a day.

Take the "tongue test." Wondering how well you're doing with your oral hygiene? A quick way to find out is by swiping your tongue across your teeth: If they feel gritty rather than smooth, you may have left some plaque behind.

Be sure to also ask your dentist for additional tips on better brushing and flossing. Improving your technique can help you put even more distance between you and dental disease.

If you would like more information on daily care for teeth and gums, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Daily Oral Hygiene.”


By Jeffrey Mason, DMD
January 01, 2022
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: dental care  
ProperDentalWorkCareWillExtendTheirLongevity

Modern dental restorations are not only more life-like than past generations, but also more durable. Today's fillings, crowns and bridges can last for years or even decades.

But that doesn't mean you can set them and forget them—they all require some level of maintenance and care. Here are 3 common restorations and what you need to do to make them last.

Fillings. Whether traditional dental amalgam ("silver") or tooth-colored composites, fillings today are incredibly strong and durable. But they do have one point of vulnerability, especially larger ones—the seam where the filling material meets the natural tooth. Bacteria tend to build up along this seam, which could lead to decay and the formation of a new cavity that weakens the filling. To avoid this, be sure you're brushing and flossing everyday and seeing your dentist at least twice a year.

Veneers. Dentists bond these thin shells of tooth-colored porcelain over the visible surface of teeth to hide chips, stains or other blemishes. But although the bonding agents we use create an incredibly strong hold, the bond between the veneer and tooth could weaken when subjected to higher than normal biting forces produced by nail-biting, ice-chewing or a tooth grinding habit. If you have such a habit, see your dentist about ways to minimize it and protect your veneers.

Bridges. Traditional bridges consist of an array of artificial crowns with those in the middle substituting for the missing teeth, while those on the end attach to the natural teeth on either side of the gap to support the bridge. Bridges can also be supported by dental implants. In either case, tooth decay or gum disease could undermine the natural teeth or bone supporting a bridge. To avoid a bridge failure, keep the areas around supporting teeth or implants clean and regularly checked by a dentist.

Above all, the danger dental disease poses to natural tissues also threatens the restorations that depend on them. Keeping your mouth free of disease is your best strategy for ensuring your dental work enjoys a long, functional life.

If you would like more information on protecting your dental work, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Extending the Life of Your Dental Work.”